A Well World: An Overflow of Gratitude

In this season, even more than usual, I see blessings at every turn. As many of us prepare for Thanksgiving feasts and begin to buy gifts to show appreciation for loved ones, gratitude is a prevailing theme, and this focus makes it even easier to see the many things for which we are deeply thankful.

As I reflect on the ways The Well has been blessed recently, I feel gratitude bubbling up inside me for the many who give their time and their resources so that those in our community who live with serious mental illnesses have reason to give thanks as well. Continue reading

Christmas Celebration

Our annual Christmas Celebration was a great success, thanks to donors and volunteers. Like all activities and programs at The Well Community, the meaningful worship service and festive holiday party happened because the wider community turned out to help.

Special thanks for the meal to volunteers from Cliff Temple Baptist Church, Kessler Park United Methodist Church, St. Jude’s Church and The Well Auxiliary. Brent McDougal, pastor of Cliff Temple, and members of their choir lead the worship time, along with members of The Well. Our backpacks filled with personal care items came from donors to Body Oak Cliff, and gift cards came through donations to The Well Auxiliary.

(Click on image to view as slides.)

Basic Blessings

Like many of you, my Thanksgiving Day tradition includes taking some time to count my blessings. So many are obvious: good health, loving family, ample food, a warm home, faithful friends, a great neighborhood, an uplifting church, meaningful work. I suspect most of those items are on your list, too. In fact, for most of us, if we’re not careful to stop and take inventory from time to time, we’re likely to take those good gifts for granted. Continue reading

The Gift of Listening

By Catherine Downing and Elizabeth Downing
posted with permission

As the holiday season goes into full swing, we are aware of what comes with our celebrations: lots of activities, generous dessert tables and endless gatherings. It is, indeed, a time to be surrounded by family and friends. Most of us greet this time of the year with open arms and excitement; we look forward to spending extra time celebrating with those closest to us.

However, as we embrace this time of the year, there are those who see the holidays with a much different outlook. Your loved ones living with mental health conditions may view the holiday season as a gauntlet of triggers and with overall dread. For many, interactions with particular family members or having to be on point in large group settings can create feelings of anxiety and need for isolation. Continue reading